WE NEVER FORGET: Thomas Baldwin, Union Coal Miner, Murdered at Raleigh, West Virginia, November 13, 1917

Pray for the dead
And fight like hell for the living.
-Mother Jones

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WNF Thomas Baldwin, UMW, Raleigh WV, Nov 13, 1917

~~~~~~~~~~~

Brother Thomas Baldwin
of the United Mine Workers of America
Murdered by Company Gunthug
November 13, 1917
Raleigh, West Virginia

Brother Thomas Baldwin, union miner, was going about his business in Raleigh, West Virginia on the evening of Tuesday November 13, 1917, when company gunthug, Sam Crews, snuck up behind him and slugged him over the head with a blackjack. He died three hours later. He left a widow and three small children to survive as best they could without a husband and father. Brother Baldwin’s grave can be found marked by a simple stone at Raleigh Cemetery, Glen Morgan, Raleigh County, West Virginia.

“Raleigh Cemetery Watcher” at Topix has posted an article from the Raleigh Register Herald of November 1917 (exact date not given) which describes Brother Baldwin:

Baldwin, say his neighbors at Raleigh, was a good, reliable man, a steady worker, and provided well for his wife and three children. He was a member of the United Mine Worker’s local that had been organized there some time ago, but was not inclined to give trouble. It appears that there was no reason whatever for his assailant’s attack upon him.

He lived with his family about 200 yards from the company store at Raleigh. After supper, on the night of the murder he had gone to the store for some purpose. As he started for his home he noticed that Crews was following him. He stopped and spoke in a friendly manner to the guard, who replied in kind and then suddenly dealt him a heavy blow on the head with some blunt weapon, presumably a blackjack. Badly wounded, Baldwin made his way to his home and dropped upon a bed. Two physicians were called. They found his skull fractured and an artery severed. In about three hours he died.

Continue reading “WE NEVER FORGET: Thomas Baldwin, Union Coal Miner, Murdered at Raleigh, West Virginia, November 13, 1917”

Hellraisers Journal: Eugene Debs on Mother Jones: “wherever the battle waxes hottest there she surely will be found upon the firing line.”

EVD Quote re Mother Jones, AtR, Nov 23, 1907

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hellraisers Journal, Sunday November 24, 1907
Eugene V. Debs on “The Grand Old Woman of the Revolutionary Movement”

From the Appeal to Reason of November 23, 1907:

“MOTHER” JONES.
—–

BY EUGENE V. DEBS.
—–

Mother Jones, Fort Worth Telegram, Apr 26, 1907

“The ‘Grand Old Woman’ of the revolutionary movement” is the appropriate title given to Mother Jones by Walter Hurt. All who know her—and they are legion—will at once recognize the fitness of the title.

The career of this unique old agitator reads like romance. There is no other that can be compared to it. For fifteen years she has been at the forefront, and never once has she been known to flinch.

From the time of the Pullman strike in 1894, when she first came into prominence, she has been steadily in the public eye. With no desire to wear “distinction’s worthless badge,” utterly forgetful of self and scorning all selfish ambitions, this brave woman has fought the battles of the oppressed with a heroism more exalted than ever sustained a soldier upon the field of carnage.

Mother Jones is not one of the “summer soldiers” or “sunshine patriots.” Her pulses burn with true patriotic fervor, and wherever the battle waxes hottest there she surely will be found upon the firing line.

For many weary months at a time she has lived amid the most desolate regions of West Virginia, organizing the half-starved miners, making her home in their wretched cabins, sharing her meagre substance with their families, nursing the sick and cheering the disconsolate—a true minister of mercy.

During the great strike in the anthracite coal district she marched at the head of the miners; was first to meet the sheriff and the soldiers, and last to leave the field of battle.

Again and again has this dauntless soul been driven out of some community by corporation hirelings, enjoined by courts, locked up in jail, prodded by the bayonets of soldiers, and threatened with assassination. But never once in all her self-surrendering life has she shown the white feather; never once given a single sign of weakness or discouragement. In the Colorado strikes Mother Jones was feared, as was no other, by the criminal corporations; feared by them as she was loved by the sturdy miners she led again and again in the face of overwhelming odds until, like Henry of Navarre, where her snow-white crown was seen, the despairing slaves took fresh courage and fought again with all their waning strength against the embattled foe.

Deported at the point of bayonets, she bore herself so true a warrior that she won even the admiration of the soldiers, whose order it was to escort her to the boundary lines and guard against her return.

No other soldier in the revolutionary cause has a better right to recognition in this edition than has “Mother” Jones.

Her very name expresses the Spirit of the Revolution.

Her striking personality embodies all its principles.

She has won her way into the hearts of the nation’s toilers, and her name is revealed at the altars of their humble firesides and will be lovingly remembered by their children and their children’s children forever.

[Photograph added.]

Continue reading “Hellraisers Journal: Eugene Debs on Mother Jones: “wherever the battle waxes hottest there she surely will be found upon the firing line.””

Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts & Doings of Mother Jones for October 1917, Part II: Claude G. Bowers, “She is not afraid of man or devil.”


You ought to be out raising hell.
This is the fighting age.
Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hellraisers Journal, Friday November 23, 1917
Mother Jones News for October, Part II: Claude G. Bowers on Mother Jones

Mother Jones, Colorado Military Bastile, March 1914

Claude G. Bowers, journalists, spent a few hours with Mother Jones while she was traveling from Colorado to Indianapolis sometime around October 19th (see Mother Jones News for October, part 1), and writes about that meeting for his column, “Kabbages and Kings.” Bowers notes that Mother “is not afraid of man or devil,” and as an example tells of her experiences in Colorado during the Colorado Coalfield Strike of 1913-1914. During that struggle, Mother was held for almost one month in the “Military Bastile,” a cold cellar cell which had already claimed the life of a miner held prisoner there. She counseled “her boys” not to attempt a rescue, “Maybe I can do some good in the bull pen,” she said.

Continue reading “Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts & Doings of Mother Jones for October 1917, Part II: Claude G. Bowers, “She is not afraid of man or devil.””

Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts & Doings of Mother Jones for October 1917, Part I: Found in West Virginia, Washington D.C. and Colorado


You ought to be out raising hell.
This is the fighting age.
Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hellraisers Journal, Thursday November 22, 1917
Mother Jones News for October, Part I: Up Against the West Virginia Gunthugs

Mother Jones Fire Eater, Lg Crpd, St L Str, Aug 23, 1917

During the month of October 1917, we find Mother Jones in Raleigh, West Virginia, once more facing the Baldwin-Felts gunthugs. Lawrence Dwyer, organizer for the United Mine Workers of America, described the encounter:

So Mother Jones, accompanied by District President Gilmore, Lawrence Dwyer and other representatives, went to the meeting in an automobile, and as the meeting was assembling alongside of the county road, three shots were fired from a rifle on the hillside and sixty gunmen came from the hills, each having a high-powered 30-30 rifle. They swarmed around Mother Jones and the officials with her and they all having their rifles pointing at Mother Jones, and they said they would “shoot her damned head off,” but Mother Jones didn’t appear to scare at all; in fact, when they threatened to shoot her she told them back, “Oh, no you won’t.” In fact, I know I felt more uneasy than Mother Jones did.

Mother was also found in Washington, D. C., and in Colorado during the month of October 1917.

From The Beckley Messenger of October 2, 1917:

MINERS HOLD MEETING

A large number of miners from Raleigh and intermediate mines met in Beckley Sunday afternoon and held a meeting at the court house. Plans looking to the betterment of working conditions were discussed. “Mother” Jones was present and expressed the wish that the coal companies might dispense with the services of armed guards, wherever they were employed.

Continue reading “Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts & Doings of Mother Jones for October 1917, Part I: Found in West Virginia, Washington D.C. and Colorado”

Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts and Doings of Mother Jones for October 1907, Found in Utah & Chicago

Mother Jones Quote, Red Flag, DNT Aug 11, 1907, p7

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hellraisers Journal, Thursday November 14, 1907
Mother Jones News Round-Up for October, Found in Utah & Chicago

From Utah’s Eureka Reporter of October 4, 1907:

Mother Jones, Mar 11, 1905, AtR

Mother Jones Will Speak Here Again
—–

The Ladies Socialist Club will hold a meeting in the Elks Hall tomorrow evening the program to include an address by Mother Jones who will arrive in town again tomorrow morning. The ladies will probably prepare refreshments for the occasion.

———-

[Photograph added.]

From The Eureka Reporter of October 11, 1907:

Political [News]
—–

From the present indication the voters of Eureka will have to choose between the Republican and Socialist tickets as the Democrats are undoubtedly down and out as far as the coming election is concerned. Some of the prominent members of the party are in favor of putting up a ticket but it would be a hard matter to secure candidates who would willing to dig up for campaign expenses as they realize that there is absolutely no chance to elect anyone upon a Democratic ticket in Eureka. One or two who have taken a prominent part in Democratic affairs here state that they would rather see an endorsement of the Socialist ticket than to allow the matter to go by the board but we believe that the rank and file of the Democratic party here are with the Republicans as they realize that the city is in splendid condition as a result of the clean business like city government which we have had here for the past four years.

—–

The Ladies’ Socialist Club held a meeting at the Elk’s hall last Saturday night [October 5th] and selected the following new officers: Mrs. D. J. Russell, financial secretary, Mrs. Robert Adamson, organizer and Mrs. George A. Udall, recording secretary.

Mother Jones was present and addressed the meeting and after the adjournment of the Miners Union the members of the two organizations enjoyed a nice banquet.

The Ladies Socialist Club will hold regular meetings in the future.

———-

Hellraisers Journal of October 11, 1907, reported on the death, on Labor Day, of Federal District Judge John Jay Jackson who so famously tangle with Mother Jones during the U. M. W. of A. organizing drive of 1902 in state of West Virginia.

Mother later described her thoughts on her exchange with the “Old Injunction Judge,” whereby, by most accounts, she got the better the him:

Plea for Justice, Not Charity, Quote Mother Jones

Continue reading “Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts and Doings of Mother Jones for October 1907, Found in Utah & Chicago”

Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts & Doings of Mother Jones for September 1917, Part I: Found in Illinois and Kentucky

Mother Jones Quote, 2x4 kaiser union recognition hell freeze over.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hellraisers Journal, Thursday October 18, 1917
Mother Jones News for September, Part I: Speech in Springfield

From the Illinois State Register of September 1, 1917:

On the evening of August 31st, Mother Jones spoke in Springfield, Illinois, to striking carmen and their supporters. The speech was well-covered the next day by the Register.

MOTHER JONES ASKS AID
FOR CAR STRIKERS
—–
Tells Unionists to Unite in Fight
Against Street Car Company and Win
—–

4,000 HEAR SPEAKER
—–
Crowds Throng Court House Yard
and Cheer as Advocate of Labor Talks
—–

Mother Jones, IL State Rgstr p2, Springfield, Sept 1, 1917

Four thousand striking car men, members of allied labor organizations and curious outsiders last night on the court house square heard “Mother” Jones, self-confessed labor agitator and proud of it, urged the strikers and their sympathizers to disregard judges, courts, injunctions or any other power that might be invoked and to fight the street railway company until it is forced to meet the demands of the union.

Less extreme than she is reported to have been in other cities where labor troubles were in progress, “Mother” Jones did not directly urge the strikers to resort to violence in gaining their ends, but she demanded that every allied labor organization in Springfield take up the cause, have their meters removed and go out on “sympathy” strikes to tie up the city’s industries until pressure is brought to bear to force the utility company to admit itself beaten.

The meeting, advertised to be held in Carpenters’ hall, was transferred to the court house grounds, when it became evident long before the time set for “Mother” Jones to speak, that not one-third of those who wished to hear her would be able to get into the hall. Before half-past seven the hall was packed, and hundreds were thronging the street before the building seeking admittance. Continue reading “Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts & Doings of Mother Jones for September 1917, Part I: Found in Illinois and Kentucky”

Hellraisers Journal: How Mother Jones Became Known as “The Most Dangerous Woman in America”

Quote re Mother Jones, Most Dangerous Woman, Machinists Mly, Sept 1915

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hellraisers Journal, Sunday October 13, 1907
Remembering Mother Jones in West Virginia in 1902

Mother Jones by Bertha Howell (Mrs Mailly), ab 1902

With the recent passing of Judge John Jay Jackson, the Old Injunction Judge, who was the bane of the United Mine Workers of America during their struggles in West Virginia back in 1902, we recall how Mother Jones earned her reputation as a “dangerous woman.” Dangerous she was then, and is yet today, to those seeking to keep the miners beat down and their union broken, but in the coal camps across the nation, where men labor for long hours at low pay, she is known as “The Miners’ Angel.”

According to some accounts, during the trial of July 24th of that year, the United States Attorney pointed his finger at her and declared:

There sits the most dangerous woman in America. She comes into a State where peace and prosperity reign. She crooks her finger-twenty thousand contented working men lay down their tools and walk out.

The Worker of July 27, 1902 reported the story:

THE TRIAL OF MOTHER JONES.
—–
Federal District Attorney Declares Her
a Dangerous Woman.
—–

Decision Not Yet Given as The Worker goes to Press–
Vigorous Effort to Imprison or Banish
Brave Woman from West Virginia.

Tuesday, July 24, was the day set for Judge Jackson of the United State court at Parkersburg, W. Va., to give his decision in the cases of Mother Jones, Thos. Haggerty, and eleven other organizers of the United Mine Workers, under arrest for having violated an infamous injunction which forbids them to hold miners’ meetings anywhere within sight of the mine properties, to march on the public roads in the vicinity, or, as a correspondent of The Worker put it, to do anything except eat and drink-and the West Virginia miners don’t get a chance to eat too much, with or with-[out?] injunctions.

Reese Blizzard, United States District Attorney, conducted the prosecution. He is counted a very able lawyer and he used all his powers to carry his point-or, rather, to carry the point for the mine owners. His closing speech occupied four hours.

Cannot Understand Her.

Mother Jones is obviously considered the most dangerous offender. The “Operators” and their tools cannot understand this wonderful little woman, who is content to labor incessantly, to go hungry and cold sometimes, to endure all manner of hardships and insults and dangers, to go to prison, if need be, in order to carry on her work of organizing and educating and inspiring the miners, and whom the strongest men among the mine workers treat with such confidence and such perfect respect.

“A Dangerous Woman.”

The press reports say that Blizzard called attention to the fact that Mother Jones was especially dangerous owing to the fact that her influence among the miners is almost unlimited and that, also by reason of her powerful intellect she is an instrument of great harm. The miners, he said, are receiving good wages and their condition is satisfactory, but, according to the testimony of this woman, she has come into this state with the express intention of getting eight or nine thousand miners to throw down their tools and quit work that they may help the two or three hundred who were dissatisfied with their condition and had quit the service of their employers.

Continue reading “Hellraisers Journal: How Mother Jones Became Known as “The Most Dangerous Woman in America””

Hellraisers Journal: Remembering Judge John Jay Jackson Who Famously Tangled with Mother Jones in 1902

Plea for Justice, Not Charity, Quote Mother Jones


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hellraisers Journal, Friday October 11, 1907
Old Injunction Judge, John J. Jackson, Passed Away on Labor Day

From the Lincoln, Nebraska, Commoner of September 13, 1907:

Mother Jones by Bertha Howell (Mrs Mailly), ab 1902

THE DEATH of Judge John J. Jackson on Labor Day was a coincidence that was noted by thousands of the older members of American trades unions. Judge Jackson earned the sobriquet of “the iron judge” by reason of his many drastic injunctions against union men. In his anxiety to protect property rights Judge Jackson often lost sight of human rights. It was he who sent “Mother” Jones to jail for daring to make a public address in violation of his injunction, and he enjoined a Methodist preacher from conducting a prayer meeting of striking coal miners in Pennsylvania. At another time he enjoined striking miners from walking the public highways to and from meetings of their local union. The abuse of the injunction writ was forcibly demonstrated by Judge Jackson on many occasions. He was the last of the federal judges appointed by President Lincoln. He resigned a few years ago on account of ill health and advancing age.

———-

[Photograph added.]

From The Fairmont West Virginian of September 6, 1907:

An interesting article, here reprinted from the Chicago Record-Herald of August 3, 1902, provides some insight into the background of the Old Injunction Judge who ruled over the miners of West Virginia with an iron fist from his seat on the Federal Bench in Parkersburg. The Judge came from a family who championed freedom and liberty (for themselves) yet held in bondage, on the family plantation in Old Virginia, human beings as chattel slaves. They loved their slaves, John Jackson had said in 1861, yet loved the Union more. We believe it was Slavery that they loved, not their slaves, for if they truly loved them, as people, they would not have kept them enslaved.

Continue reading “Hellraisers Journal: Remembering Judge John Jay Jackson Who Famously Tangled with Mother Jones in 1902”

Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts and Doings of Mother Jones for September 1907, Found in Park City, Utah

[Old Glory, Our Flag]
-with all its faults, I dearly love,
and under it I stand for international brotherhood,
government ownership and universal equality.
-Mother Jones

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hellraisers Journal, Thursday October 10, 1907
Mother Jones News Round-Up for September, Found in Utah

From The Inter-Mountain Republican of September 2, 1907:

“MOTHER JONES” TO DELIVER ADDRESS
—–
Interesting Program Planned For
Labor Day at Park City.
—–

Republican Special Service.

Mother Jones, Mar 11, 1905, AtR

Park City, Sept. 1.-The Park City Miners’ union, which is in charge of the celebration of Labor day, has completed the arrangements for the event and provided amusement for young and old. The festivities will begin at 9 o’clock in the morning with a parade, in which the union will figure prominently. The fire department and school children, with the Park City military band, will lead the procession.

Prominent in the program will be an address by “Mother” Jones, who is known by all as an earnest worker in the cause of the laboring man. A stand has been erected on the Marsac ground for speakers . Various sports will follow the program….

[Photograph added.]

From The Salt Lake Tribune of September 3, 1907:

“MOTHER” JONES SPEAKS AT
PARK CITY CELEBRATION
—–

Special to The Tribune.

PARK CITY. Sept. 2.-Labor day in Park City was fittingly celebrated. At 9:30 a. m. the parade formed on Main street, at the Miners’ Union hall.

The parade was headed by the Park City fire department, followed by Harry Weist as flag-bearer. Then came the Military band and tho city officers. The members of the Miners’ union, small boys and girls, and, lastly, the “Hoot, Hoot” band.

The line of march was north on Main street to Heber avenue, then south on Park avenue to First street, then north on Main street to the band stand, where in a short address Mr. Langford introduced the speaker of the day, “Mother” Jones, as she is known. “Mother” Jones spoke for one hour and thirty minutes on the “Wealth of the Nation,” and the amount contributed to it by the laboring classes….

Continue reading “Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts and Doings of Mother Jones for September 1907, Found in Park City, Utah”

Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts & Doings of Mother Jones for August 1917, Part II: Found in Illinois & Indiana


You ought to be out raising hell.
This is the fighting age.
Put on your fighting clothes.
-Mother Jones
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hellraisers Journal, Friday September 21, 1917
Mother Jones News for August, Part II: Plans for Labor Day

From the Evansville Press of August 29, 1917:

An advertisement indicates that Mother Jones will be the principle speaker at the Henderson, Kentucky, Labor Day Celebration on Monday September 3rd. The event is being sponsored by the Central Labor Unions of both Evansville, Indiana, and Henderson.

MJ Labor Day Evansville IN, Henderson KY, Evl Prs, Aug 29, 1917

From the Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette of August 27, 1917:

The death of Senator John Worth Kern is an opportunity to recall the role played by the good Senator in freeing Mother Jones from the grip of West Virginia’s Military Bastille during the Cabin Creek-Paint Creek Strike of 1912 & 1913.

JOHN WORTH KERN; AN APPRECIATION

Claude G. Bowers

Continue reading “Hellraisers Journal: Whereabouts & Doings of Mother Jones for August 1917, Part II: Found in Illinois & Indiana”